Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (11): Mok Kwai Lan – The Mistress of Hung Gar. — Kung Fu Tea

***In honor of the recent celebration of Mother’s Day. Enjoy!*** Introduction This post is the third entry in our series examining the lives of female Chinese martial artists. While it is the case that the vast majority of hand combat practitioners in the 19th and 20th centuries were male, a certain number of […]

via Lives of Chinese Martial Artists (11): Mok Kwai Lan – The Mistress of Hung Gar. — Kung Fu Tea

Advertisements

A Simple Way To Battle Your Thoughts — Martial Way Legacy

http://www.martialway.net This weekend was definitely tough. Just after our Free Saturday Kickboxing MMA Class we received the call, my Uncle Bobby had passed away. He was at home surrounded by his wife, family and animals which is the way he would have wanted it. Getting the news was difficult, especially just before we were […]

via A Simple Way To Battle Your Thoughts — Martial Way Legacy

Wing Chun Online

An Online Wing Chun Training Program that is not just about watching videos, it provides you with the tools to train with other practitioners in your area. ANYTIME, ANYWHERE For anyone interested in Practical Wing Chun and are unable to physically train regularly on location, this program allows it’s members to train with Practical Wing…

via Practical Wing Chun Australia – Online Training Group — Wing Chun United

Kumogakure Ryu

by Fane Hervey – Ninjutsu London

Meaning “Hiding in the Clouds School“, Kumogakure Ryu was founded by Heinaizaemon Ienaga Iga (of the Iga clan) in the middle 16th century. Like Togakure Ryu, which was paired with Kumogakure Ryu by the Toda family in the 17th Century, it is a ninjutsu school of thinking. Both schools teach that violence can basically be avoided. You learn how to go with the flow so that you can achieve what is best for yourself. It is all about adapting oneself to one’s environment.

The Taijutsu (body movement) of Kumogakure Ryu is almost identical to Togakure Ryu. Soke Hatsumi has demonstrated the Kumogakure taijutsu in the past, which was reminiscent of walking in a woman’s kimono; the feet taking small steps, which allows the knees to remain very close together (bent inwards), protecting the groin. This is of course very similar, if not identical to Wing Chun Kung Fu.

One of the special weapons of the school is the kamayari (a cross-bar spear). This was originally a type of grappling device for climbing onto ships, but proved useful for combating sword bearers too. An infamous ninja called Sarutobi Sasuke who was known for his amazing ability to leap form one tree to the next, used the Kamayari in order to swing from branch to branch like a monkey.Despite the close feet, the Kumogakure is known for its great leaps during close combat. Takamatsu Sensei was reputed to be able to leap 8 feet from standstill. Another taijutsu proficiency was the use of double blocks and strikes, as well as strikes against the forearm, yet again, similar to Wing Chun Kung Fu.

In the same vain, the Ippon Sugi Noburi (a metal pipe with an extendable chain inside and 3 claws at the end) was used for both climbing trees and as a flexible weapon in the Kumogakure Ryu. As well as leaping through trees, the Ninja’s of the Kumogakure would wear demon’s masks to frighten their opposition, and they would use the horns on the masks much like an animal would; by headbutting their opponents. They would also use torches that burnt when wet and other survival tactics for extreme environments, making them appear super human or like demons to their rivals. These types of deception and mind games were common implements for the ninja.

To visit Fane Hervey’s site or read more of his writing’s on Ninjutsu visit – www.ninjutsulondon.com

Martial arts “purity” is a lie and so is “tradition”

A frequently remembered moment among my staff (which are also my students) was an episode at a martial arts business event where several instructors ask me how I generate so much content; this blog, my facebook posts, my youtube, my DVD’s, my books, my secret facebook group(s) (YES, several0, etc etc yadda yadda. To which […]

via NSFW Blogging: martial arts “purity” is a lie and so is “tradition” — Sifu David Ross

Chinese Martial Arts in the News: April 9th, 2018: Taijiquan, MMA and the Southern Chinese Martial Arts — Kung Fu Tea

Introduction Welcome to “Chinese Martial Arts in the News!” Lots has been happening in the Chinese martial arts community, so its time to see what people have been saying. For new readers, this is a semi-regular feature here at Kung Fu Tea in which we review media stories that mention or affect the traditional fighting arts. In […]

via Chinese Martial Arts in the News: April 9th, 2018: Taijiquan, MMA and the Southern Chinese Martial Arts — Kung Fu Tea

The air up here. — The Little Fighter With A Big Heart

Well, it’s nice to check in with you all again. I thought I’d say thanks as always for checking in with my now less regular than I’d like blog. You must of had a slightly less exciting than usual Easter because I had a lot of visits. That’s always good to see. Although I keep […]

via The air up here. — The Little Fighter With A Big Heart

Cobra Kai and the TRUTH about the Karate Kid

The Tai Chi Notebook

I really need (do I really?) to write something about this new Cobra Kai film coming out on YouTube Red (whatever that is – I think it’s just another way of saying, er, “YouTube you have to pay for”).

Here’s the trailer:

I’m picking up unusual levels of intelligence and self-awareness from this trailer. There has been a long-running fan theory that everybody got Karate Kid wrong. That Ralph Macchio’s character, Danny, the Karate Kid himself, wasn’t the hero of the film at all – he was the villain!

Check out the theory here:

It’s a good example of how you can view the same events from a different perspective and come up with a different version of “the truth”.

From watching the trailer, Cobra Kai seems well aware of this theory and is playing on it very well. From the trailer it seems that Daniel has grown up to be a bit…

View original post 91 more words

Through a Lens Darkly (51): Early Kendo in California

Kung Fu Tea

Boy Scouts practice Kendo in California, 1928. Source: Vintage Press Photo. Author’s Personal Collection.

Of Boy Scouts and Kendo

A recent post focused on the role of the global scouting movement in promoting the spread of the Asian martial arts during the first half of the 20th century. In that essay I mentioned a photograph of Japanese-American and Caucasian scouts practicing Kendo together in California during the 1920s. Yet observant readers may have noticed I did not actually include that photo in the post.

Sadly I had misplaced that particular photo so it didn’t make it into that piece. But it recently resurfaced as I was shuffling through my collection. Better yet, I came across another related item which also helps to add detail to our understanding of Kendo in America prior to 1941.

I quite like the first of these press photos. In it we see two figures seemingly…

View original post 1,586 more words

Pushing and Pulling: Scouts and the Spread of the Asian Martial Arts

Structure and Agency Contrary to popular opinion, nature does not love parsimony. This frequently repeated opinion is more an aesthetic judgement on the part of some scholars rather than an empirical observation about the actual functioning of the natural or social worlds. When looking at questions as complex as the global spread of the […]

via Pushing and Pulling: Scouts and the Spread of the Asian Martial Arts — Kung Fu Tea