Chinese Martial Arts in the News: August 19, 2019: Hong Kong, Bruce Lee and New Books! — Kung Fu Tea

Introduction Its been a long hot month with lots of Chinese martial arts news. That means that now (before the start of the new semester) is the perfect time to get caught up on recent events! For new readers, this is a semi-regular feature here at Kung Fu Tea in which we review media stories that mention […]

via Chinese Martial Arts in the News: August 19, 2019: Hong Kong, Bruce Lee and New Books! — Kung Fu Tea

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Why Martial Arts Are Great for Kids!!!

Education is very important for kids. But besides attending school, your kids should also be engaged in some kind of athletic activity. This would allow them to develop a more versatile set of skills.

Martial arts are one of the best ways to have your kids engaged in physical activity. But how exactly are your kids going to benefit from them?

We’d like to pinpoint 4 key benefits of martial arts for kids and make you pack your backpack and go to work out!

Athletic development

Nowadays, health and weight issues are quite common among adults. Thereby, it is exceptionally important to set kids on the right track and teach them to appreciate and care for their health.

If your kids like martial arts, they are going to become more for them than just a thing that you want them to do. Training would become a lifestyle for your kids, and no matter what, they would want to keep martial arts in their life.

Even just buying a punching bag for your kid and let him/her train on it. It will have a dramatic effect on the whole athletic development especially if its combined with training in a gym.

In addition, kids grow rapidly, and martial arts can improve their growth. Rather than sit all day in front of the computer, kids should engage in physical activities. Don’t get us wrong, kids should do what they like, but it would be great to mix things up with some exercise.

Self-defense skills

Many people study martial arts because they want to acquire self-defense skills. And since the world we are living in isn’t particularly safe, self-defense skills are very valuable for kids to have.

And among kids, physical conflict is very common. Children test their capabilities and have a need to affirm themselves, which causes bullying. And while fighting isn’t always the best answer to bullies, your kids should have the skills to defend themselves with.

Discipline

Discipline is a very important thing to teach to your kids. And what better way than via martial arts?

Martial arts, as pretty much any other athletic activity, have their own challenges. Performing a move hundreds of times may be routine and difficult, but it is necessary to do to become better.

Life isn’t as easy as it may seem to kids. And by adding some controlled difficulty to it, martial arts may be able to teach them to work for the result.

Respect

Respect arguably is the most valuable asset martial arts could provide your kids with. All other benefits are very important as well, but respect is a thing that many young people lack. And you’d certainly want your kids to have the right moral standards ingrained in them.

During sparring, there are certain rules to be followed. Children bow to each other, as well as to their instructors and the masters who came before them. They also learn to respect their partners and establish proper boundaries for behavior.

Instructors also play a key role in the establishment of moral standards in kids. Good instructors are going to stress the respect issue regularly and remind children to respect their self, their peers, teachers, and parents.

Martial arts may seem to be about punching, kicking, and throwing. But in reality, all the physical benefits of martial arts are secondary to the moral standards which kids can learn from their instructors.

Review of Tancheng Chan Kung fu School

Check out some of the latest reviews of Tancheng Chan Kung fu School one of the most affordable schools available for learning kung fu in China.

Tan Cheng Chan Wu International Kung fu School 

Tancheng Chan Wu International Kung fu School is an all-inclusive residential kung fu school in China offering food, accommodation, martial arts training and additional classes for very reasonable prices. At this kung fu school you can learn Shaolin Kung fu, Taichi, Qigong, Wing Chun, Calligraphy, and even Chinese traditional music. With 3 meals a day included as well as the choice of rooms or a private apartment students are given a level of flexibility that is not available at some other international martial arts schools in China in terms of accommodation options.

Located in Linyi, Shandong Province and close to Mengshan National Park the martial arts school has a rural feel as well as a good Kung fu Master to Kung fu Student ratio. Living costs at the school are low and the school translators are more than happy to provide students with assistance when necessary either when learning kung fu or for daily life.

Ashraf Abouali, from Lebanon

“The Tancheng Chan Kungfu School is a great place to learn Kungfu and experience the best form of the Chinese culture, it is located in a peaceful place surrounded by farms and large wheat fields, I learnt Wingchun and Shoilin Kungfu and gained a brotherhood that will stay with me for life. The masters are amazing, they care for you alot and they will consider you part of there family, and they will listen to all what you have to say and make you benifet from all you potentials. “

Salman Abouali, from Lebanon

“Tancheng Chanwu international kungfu school is the best place to learn kungfu and the best experience you can make in life with best masters.”

Markus Joohs, from Germany

“Good atmosphere to train and experience kungfu, friendly staff and experienced kungfu masters. Very nice area and real China feeling and great food, nice vegetarian options especially for breakfast. Have been there for a month and hope to go there soon again”.

Kenadid Osman, from Somalia

“A great place to learn kung fu, located in beautiful countryside by lashes and trees, masters are pretty helpful and professional, people at the school are friendly And place is so clean. It doesn’t matter whether you’re familiar with martial arts or not. In just three months i learnt kung fu skills that i will use over a lifetime.”

For further information on this school you can visit the studymartialarts.org website for an independent look at what the school has to offer. For a quick guide to pricing see their monthly prices below.

 

The Drunken Boxing podcast. Episode 1 Marin Spivak. — The Tai Chi Notebook

Byron Jacobs, who produced the excellent XingYi San Ti Shi primer I posted recently, has launched a new podcast that’s well worth checking out. In the first episode, Byron talks to Marin Spivak, Chen Tai Chi disciple of Chen Yu, about what it’s like going to live and train gung fu in Beijing as a […]

via The Drunken Boxing podcast. Episode 1 Marin Spivak. — The Tai Chi Notebook

Research Notes: A Japanese Martial Arts Demonstration — Kung Fu Tea

It will come as no surprise to regular readers that I am a fan of late 19th and early 20th century martial arts ephemera. Postcards, being visual, cheap and easily mailed around the globe, were one vector by which popular images of a wide variety of physical and combative practices were spread. As we […]

via Research Notes: A Japanese Martial Arts Demonstration — Kung Fu Tea

Three Thoughts on Hong Kong, Social Dislocation and the Fog of War — Kung Fu Tea

“Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future.” Niels Bohr (among others). With Trepidation I would like to outline three quick points about the current situation in Hong Kong, particularly as it relates to (and sometimes sidesteps) the traditional martial arts. Like many of you, I am following events in the city […]

via Three Thoughts on Hong Kong, Social Dislocation and the Fog of War — Kung Fu Tea

XingYi footwork explained — The Tai Chi Notebook

Byron Jacobs has another video out in his XingYi series, this time focussing on footwork. If you’re after the basics of XingYi then this is the best place to start. I think footwork is especially important in XingYi as much of the defending is done not by deflecting things (like you find in Tai Chi) […]

via XingYi footwork explained — The Tai Chi Notebook

Tips for Competing in a BJJ Tournament — A Skirt on the Mat

While there are a number of people who read this blog and don’t do jiu jitsu, there are some, and maybe a few of them have thought about competing in the near future. This is by no means a complete list, but here are a couple of tips and things to keep in mind if […]

via Tips for Competing in a BJJ Tournament — A Skirt on the Mat

How Martial Arts Gives You The Confidence To Honestly Express Yourself 

Legendary actor and martial artist, Bruce Lee, once stated that ‘martial arts means honestly expressing yourself.’ During his short life span, Bruce Lee blessed us with several timeless truths that are applicable not just to martial arts, but to life in general. The practice of martial arts, according to Lee, does not simply entail learning how to fight better; rather it means understanding your being in a more holistic way, and thus being able to express yourself better and more honestly. To express oneself honestly means having the confidence to go against the fear of being judged by others. This confidence is developed through martial arts training in two main ways.

Skills Self-Confidence Leads To Overall Self-confidence

When you begin training for martial arts, you will discover that with time, you become self-confident in the specific martial arts skills that you’re learning. For example, if your primary goal was self-defense, you will become confident in the skills you have learnt to defend yourself. Indeed, self-defense comes from skills and confidence. After martial arts training, you will have confidence in your ability to execute specific martial arts techniques in the correct way and with the correct timing. With time, this skills-confidence will translate into overall self-confidence. When you become self-confident, your possibilities for integrity and autonomy are expanded, meaning that you will be able to express yourself more honestly without fear of being judged. This can mean doing something you have always wanted to do but were held back from through fear or lack of confidence. It could be starting a new personal business, taking a world trip or getting an extreme tattoo, such as the face tattoos which have recently become a common trend amongst rappers. These are all means of honestly expressing yourself without fear of judgement. Undoubtedly, honest self-expression by standing up for yourself and doing things with confidence is critical in a society that is always judging us. Martial arts training greatly aids this cause.

Discover Your Strengths And Weaknesses And Work On Improving Them

Through martial arts, you will be able to honestly assess your strengths and weaknesses, and will have an opportunity to work on both. At first, this will relate to elements such as physical strength, agility and speed. However, martial arts is different, in that it will give you both freedom and a non-judgemental avenue to work on both your skills and weaknesses, and make improvements in any way that you choose. This is especially true once you find the perfect style of martial arts for you: the one that best fits with your personality, whether that’s karate, Brazilian jiu-jitsu or MMA. You will be able to honestly express yourself, not just on the mats or inside the dojo, but also in life, where after discovering your strengths and weaknesses, you will possess the confidence to improve yourself in an honest way, and then similarly express yourself without fear of judgement.

We live in a significantly judgemental society, and having the confidence to express yourself honestly can go a long way in helping you live a happy and fulfilled life. Training in martial arts is one of the best ways to acquire this confidence.

My Martial Arts Journey

by Bill Fettes

My martial arts journey began in 1969 at the first classes of the Tomiki aikido style in Melbourne, Australia, under the guidance of (then) Leoni Heap.  I was a drifter at the time, doing unskilled work in order to finance my travels in Australia and overseas.  I was playing several contact sports at the time and Aikido was a fitness adjunct for me.  Eventually, against my better judgement, I was persuaded to attempt my shodan grading.  I had coached junior sports during my youth and suspected that I would be requested to teach when I made shodan, so I had resisted for nearly a decade.

Sure enough when I received my grading and whilst making preparations to travel to South America, I was asked to go to Sydney to fill in for a teacher who was relocating.  Not being particularly stable at the time, I accepted and through that decision was able to meet and learn from the first person to teach Shindo Muso ryu jyodo (way of the stick) in Australia, Paul Maloney sensei.

Shindo Muso ryu Jyojutsu
Shindo Muso ryu Jyojutsu at International school in Tokyo ca 1989

I was ready to depart for South America after a couple of years in Sydney, when the Falklands war broke out and I was advised it was an inopportune time to visit South America.  Step up Paul Maloney, who suggested a trip to Japan instead.  As he had not long returned from Asia himself and was full of praise for the culture and fighting arts, I quickly agreed.

Through Paul and his contacts, I obtained various introductions to Jyodo and Aikido dojos,where I trained under such notables as Kaminoda Tsunemori (SMR jyo), Ohba Hideo (Tomiki aikido), Nitta Suzuo (Toda ha Buko ryu naginata jutsu) and long-time Japan resident Phil Relnick (SMR).   Through the introduction of the principal of my Japanese language school, I commenced my third style of karate and Taijichuan, with Nakano Harumi sensei, a well-known teacher in Japan and China.  I studied with her for the best part of 8 or 9 years and, through her, was introduced to various teachers, including Matsuda Ryuichi who taught me Xingyi chuan, Bagua zhang and Shaolin chuan.  We were also regularly exposed to teachers from the Chen jia gou (Chen village) in their annual visits to Tokyo.

In 1989, I was introduced by friends to Nitta Suzuo shihan of the Toda ha Buko ryu naginata jutsu school, which I have also studied since that time.

When it was time (a regular occurrence for foreigners) to leave the country to renew my visa, Nakano sensei suggested the Chen village for further training.  Most foreigners either went home to renew their visa or went to Korea for a few days, but I wanted something more.

I wanted to continue Xingyi and Bagua as well as Taiji, so we decided on Shanghai, instead of the village and Nakano sensei gave me introductions to her friend Mr. Chu Jin Ming, who was then the vice president of the Shanghai Chin Woo athletic society and 2IC of the Shanghai Olympic Hotel, which at the time was the safest place for foreigners to meet Chinese without the obligatory “spies” getting their knickers in a knot.  Remember, this was 1987, shortly before Tiananmen

Mr. Chu introduced me to He Bing Quan who introduced me to Wang Zhong Dao.  Master He had trained with Chen Zhao Kui when they lived together in Shanghai.  He was a Shaolin master who had trained in several styles of Taijichuan under the old masters.

Wang Zhong Dao/ He Bin Quan
Wang Zhong Dao & He Bin Quan (ca 1990) at Shanghai Olympic Hotel

Master Wang had trained under Master Chu Gui Ting, a student of the famous Li Tsun Yi and taught me his version of Xingyi and Bagua – which differed slightly from Matsuda sensei’s version (which he learnt in Taiw

an).  When Master Wang died, I continued under Master Chen Jian Yun who had studied Shansi style Xingyi as well as learning from Master Chu.  When he died, I was left rudderless, to continue on my own.

Then, in 2018, I was lucky enough to find Mr. David Kelly at studymartialarts.org who provides a wonderful introduction service for practitioners seeking training in Chinese chuan fa.  Whilst scrolling through his pages, I happened to come across a reference to Master Chu Yu Cheng.  Further research showed that he was the grandson of Chu Gui Ting – fancy that, his other students (my teachers) never mentioned he had a grandson!

David quickly arranged for us to get together and I went to Shanghai for the first time in 15 years to resume my true lineage.  I found Master Chu to be extremely knowledgeable and up to date.  Lest I be considered to be a poor follower of my previous teachers, they were getting on in years and had possibly forgotten some of the deeper work.  No such problem with Master Chu – in the space of a month, he was able to upskill me, even after 30 plus years of training in the art under various Masters.

Master Chu Yu Cheng
Master Chu Yu Cheng teaching Xingyi Quan

Unfortunately, it was a test run for me and I had let my Chinese skills lapse, which made it hard for Master Chu, but he never failed to teach from his heart and luckily enough I had enough experience to bumble through.  In order to honour him and his compassionate students, I am frantically trying to rejuvenate my language skills before my next visit.

If there is one theme you will notice through this narrative about Asian combatives it is INTRODUCTIONS – they are essential in Asia (for locals and foreigners) and you won’t find a more generous spirit with the necessary contacts than David Kelly.

If you wish to read more you can find my book “At the Feet of the Masters” on Kindle books.

Best wishes

Bill Fettes

Simplified Taijichuan (Licenced instructor All Japan Taichi Assn.)

Yang style Taijichuan (Fu Zhong Wen lineage)

Chen style Taijichuan (He Bin Quan lineage from Chen Zhao kui)

Xingyi chuan (Chu Guiting lineage)

Bagua zhang (Chu Guiting lineage)

Tomiki aikido (roku dan)

Shindo Muso ryu Jyojutsu (Yodan, Go moku roku)

Isshin ryu kusari gama jutsu

Kasumi shinto ryu kenjutsu

Uchida ryu tanjyo jutsu

Toda ha Buko ryu naginata jutsu (Chuden)

You can find details of Bill’s classes here. at budokaiaustralia.com