Chinese Martial Arts in the News: August 27, 2018: The Back to School Edition! — Kung Fu Tea

Introduction Welcome to “Chinese Martial Arts in the News.” The nights are getting chilly and the new semester is just getting under way. That means it is time for our “Back to School” news update. While we have been vacationing the world of the Chinese martial arts has been busy, so lets catch up. […]

via Chinese Martial Arts in the News: August 27, 2018: The Back to School Edition! — Kung Fu Tea

Advertisements

General Zhang Zhijiang: Mixing Christianity and Kung Fu — Kung Fu Tea

A Different Take on an Old Debate If you study the traditional Chinese martial arts and have spent any time on the internet, you will have heard some variant of these debates before. Do I need to study Buddhism or Daoism to really understand Wing Chun? Are the foundational principals of Taijiquan […]

via General Zhang Zhijiang: Mixing Christianity and Kung Fu — Kung Fu Tea

Through a Lens Darkly (54): Preserving a Fading China — Kung Fu Tea

Introduction You may not know her name, but if you have any interest in modern Chinese history, it is almost certain that you have seen her photographs. Hedda Morrison (1908-1991), while not acknowledged as a leading artistic photographer during the prime of her career, had almost unprecedent opportunities to explore and photograph what she […]

via Through a Lens Darkly (54): Preserving a Fading China — Kung Fu Tea

Health Qigong – The Eight Silken Movements (VI):Eliminate Diseases, Breathe from your Dan Tian — Interact China

Written by Gioia Zhang Translated by Yuqing Yang The Eighth Section:Stand on your Toes and stretch seven times to get rid of an Illness This action can improve your calf strength and your ability to balance. The slight vibration caused by the heel lowering helps to relax and reset the muscles and relieve muscle […]

via Health Qigong – The Eight Silken Movements (VI):Eliminate Diseases, Breathe from your Dan Tian — Interact China

16 Facts You (Probably) Didn’t Know About the Chinese Martial Arts, Part II — Kung Fu Tea

Welcome to the second half of our discussion of 16 facts about the Chinese martial arts that you probably don’t know. If you are just joining us for the first time this list is a playful attempt to highlight some popular misconceptions about the Chinese martial arts while subverting a popular genre of (generally […]

via 16 Facts You (Probably) Didn’t Know About the Chinese Martial Arts, Part II — Kung Fu Tea

What are the best foods in Taiwan?

Other must try foods in Taiwan

  • Braised pork with rice (Lǔròu fàn 滷肉飯): this is a typical local braised dish eaten on a bed of white rice;
  • Taiwanese hamburger (Gē bāo 割包): steamed bread enriched with minced meat and vegetables and a dusting of peanuts, so it’s really tasty;
  • Pineapple cupcakes (Fènglí sū 鳳梨酥): Great with a nice cup of tea.
  • Onion pancakes (Cōng zhuā bǐng 蔥抓餅): Fatty and filling.
  • Taiwanese ice (Bàobīng shān 刨冰山): Crushed ice with fresh mango. The hot weather of Taipei makes Taiwanese ice a must for keeping cool.
  • Rice cake cooked in bamboo (Tǒng zǐ mǐ gāo 筒仔米糕): this is a specialty of Daqiaotou, for lovers of mushrooms and the smell of bamboo;
  • Calamari (Huāzhī 花枝): A must try. Simply amazing when done right, and perfect with a Taiwanese Beer.
  • Noodles: (Niúròu miàn 牛肉麵) Beef Noodles and rice noodles, seasoned in oyster sauce (Hézǐ miàn xiàn 蚵仔麵線), are my favourite.

“Enjoy the tastes and smells of Taiwan”. 

VIDEO: Yi Jin Jing – The Muscle Tendon change classic (Exercises 1-12 with full explanations)

The Tai Chi Notebook

yi-jin-jing-2

Below is a nice explanation video of the Yi Jin Jing by Shi Heng Yi of the Shaolin Temple Europe,  recorded during a Qi Gong Retreat in July 2018 at the Shaolin Temple Europe located in Otterberg / Kaiserslautern in Germany.

I don’t practice this set myself, but I tend to think of it as a kind of expanded version of the Ba Duan Jin, a set I do practice. As with the Ba Duan Jin, you need to keep in mind the ideas of muscle-tendon channels, and the suit idea, when you practice all qi gongs. In fact, that’s exactly what the monk is explaining in the video – “when you do this exercise you must feel which part of the body it affects, which muscles and tendons it is stretching”.

Without the understanding of muscle-tendon channels and the suit, these are just repetitious exercises, but the…

View original post 102 more words

16 Facts You (Probably) Didn’t Know About the Chinese Martial Arts, Part I

Kung Fu Tea

SHAOLIN MONASTERY, ZHENGZHOU, HENAN, CHINA – 2013/02/25: Shaolin Monastery or Shaolin Temple, a Cha?n Buddhist temple on Mount Song, near Dengfeng, Zhengzhou, Henan province, China Shaolin monks train in Kung Fu at Shaolin Monastery or Shaolin Temple, a Cha?n Buddhist temple on Mount Song, near Dengfeng, Zhengzhou.. (Photo by Jeremy Horner/LightRocket via Getty Images)

We all love clickbait. Sure, we say we hate those gimmicky titles that populate our YouTube play lists.  And none of us would willfully admit to clicking on “108 Facts about Rick and Morty” or, “20 Things that You Didn’t Know About Wing Chun”, but advertising dollars don’t lie.  Just check out the viewership on these videos.  Yeah, we all clicked on them.

The human mind loves a list. These discrete, bite-sized, bits of predigested information slot seamlessly into our larger matrix of beliefs and world views, all while invisibly reinforcing our subconscious predispositions. Nor should we ignore the…

View original post 3,071 more words

Research Notes: Weird Lions and Chinese Jiu-Jitsu in 1934 — Kung Fu Tea

I should be packing for a weekend visiting family. But before leaving I wanted to share something from my recent reading. Growing up in Western NY I had many opportunities to visit Toronto. Its Chinatown was the first of North America’s historic Chinese communities that I was able to get a real sense […]

via Research Notes: Weird Lions and Chinese Jiu-Jitsu in 1934 — Kung Fu Tea

1920: Jingwu Brings Kung Fu to Guangzhou’s Public Schools — Kung Fu Tea

It goes by many names. Organization, bureaucracy…”hard work”… It’s the sort of social effort that defines modern industrialized life. Weber famously termed it the “iron cage” of rationality. We so frequently speak of, or imagine, the martial arts as an intrusion of pre-modern tradition onto the global stage that one might be forgiven for […]

via 1920: Jingwu Brings Kung Fu to Guangzhou’s Public Schools — Kung Fu Tea