5 Bits of Wisdom from The Matrix Movies

5.) Wisdom: Choice is not as it seems. Quote: No, you’ve already made the choice. Now you have to understand it. Said by the Oracle to Neo in “The Matrix Reloaded” as they discuss a dream in which he sees Trinity falling. Interpretation: Studies in neuroscience have repeatedly validated the notion that by the time […]

via 5 Bits of Wisdom from The Matrix Movies — Stories & Movement

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Chinese Martial Arts in the News: September 11th, 2017: The Back to School Edition!

Kung Fu Tea

Guess who is coming to Philadelphia this September?

Introduction

Welcome to “Chinese Martial Arts in the News!”  This is a semi-regular feature here at Kung Fu Tea in which we review media stories that mention or affect the traditional fighting arts.  In addition to discussing important events, this column also considers how the Asian hand combat systems are portrayed in the mainstream media.

While we try to summarize the major stories over the last month, there is always a chance that we may have missed something.  If you are aware of an important news event relating to the TCMA, drop a link in the comments section below.  If you know of a developing story that should be covered in the future feel free to send me an email.

Its been way too long since our last update so there is a lot to be covered in today’s post.  Let’s get to…

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Ma Liang’s “New Wushu:” Modernizing and Militarizing the Traditional Chinese Martial Arts

Asking “What if?” Few things are more difficult to research than historical events that did not happen. This is especially true for social scientists who approach the question of theory creation and hypothesis testing from a more empirical or positivist angle. Yet difficult is not the same as “impossible.” Nor am I sure […]

via Ma Liang’s “New Wushu:” Modernizing and Militarizing the Traditional Chinese Martial Arts — Kung Fu Tea

Research Notes: The Big Knife and Ma Liang’s Attempted Comeback

Kung Fu Tea

A captured Chinese dadao being held by a Japanese soldier. Note the unique saw back blade. Source: Author’s Personal Collection.

Given that it is a holiday weekend, I will be keeping this research note brief.  Still, the subject matter is quite interesting.  China’s Republic era dadao, or big knives, generate a good deal of interest among both historians and practical martial artists.  They also played a role in the development of General Ma Liang’s career as a martial arts reformer.

In some ways that is a bit surprising.  The general’s troops were often Muslim and hailed from impoverished areas of Northern China.  Of course these were exactly the sorts of individuals that would win fame as they faced down the Japanese army along the Great Wall in 1933, or slightly later in famous Marco Polo Bridge incident.  Stories of such exploits went a long way towards explaining the general enthusiasm…

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“The rotation of the waist/pelvic region is like the turning of a wheel on an axle”

The Tai Chi Notebook

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I ran (ha!) across this article by Sam Wuest, thanks to the Steve Morris Facebook page. It’s a really interesting look at how Usain Bolt is the fastest man alive despite not conforming to accepted wisdom on running mechanics.

It turns out Mr Bolt makes clever use of waist rotation when he runs, in contrast to the normal admonitions to reduce rotational movement and increase forward and back movement you’ll get from a lot of running coaches.  By turning his waist in coordination with the running motion Mr Bolt is creating a longer lever to the floor, and everybody knows that longer levers create more power than shorter levers over the same distance.

There’s a famous line in the Tai Chi Classics that goes “The waist is like the axle and the ch’i is like the wheel“.  At one point in the article, Sam Wuest says

“The…

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Time To Make A Comeback – returning to martial arts after a long break

Fall is the perfect time to get back to things that you loved doing. If you have been away from class for any length of time, here’s an article that fits completely! You don’t need to apologize, though. It is your life, enjoy all of it…but don’t leave us out!

via Time To Make A Comeback – returning to martial arts after a long break — WHITE TIGER MARTIAL ARTS

Chinese Martial Arts in the News: August 28th, 2017: Dragon Girls, New Books and the Rebirth of the Long Spear

Kung Fu Tea

Introduction

Welcome to “Chinese Martial Arts in the News!”  This is a semi-regular feature here at Kung Fu Tea in which we review media stories that mention or affect the traditional fighting arts.  In addition to discussing important events, this column also considers how the Asian hand combat systems are portrayed in the mainstream media.

While we try to summarize the major stories over the last month, there is always a chance that we may have missed something.  If you are aware of an important news event relating to the TCMA, drop a link in the comments section below.  If you know of a developing story that should be covered in the future feel free to send me an email.

News from All Over

Our round-up starts with one of the more interesting stories that I have come across in the last few months.   A rather extensive article in the

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Travel tips for BJJ adventure travellers

I wrote this blog originally in the summer of 2016, but as I’m planning for my next BJJ adventure I thought it would be worthwhile updating it with some of my latest tips! As before I’m not going to be focusing on the how to find somewhere to train abroad. For that Sally Arsenault has […]

via Travel Tips for BJJ Adventures — BJJ Minion

How Jiu-Jitsu Became a Traditional German Martial Art

Introduction One of my on-going projects is a co-authored study of Wing Chun’s history (and social meaning) within the German martial arts community. I will admit that in the crush of competing papers and presentations this topic, while fascinating, has slipped to the back burner. Still, I believe that it is a critical […]

via How Jiu-Jitsu Became a Traditional German Martial Art — Kung Fu Tea

Hagakure – wisdom of the Samurai — The Tai Chi Notebook

“Hagakure is the essential book of the Samurai. Written by Yamamoto Tsunetomo, who was a Samurai in the early 1700s, it is a book that combines the teachings of both Zen and Confucianism. These philosophies are centered on loyalty, devotion, purity and selflessness, and Yamamoto places a strong emphasis on the notion of living in […]

via Hagakure – wisdom of the Samurai — The Tai Chi Notebook